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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 128-132

Recovery patterns of spinal cord injury after traumatic cervical cord injury in a developing country


1 Department of Orthopaedics, Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
2 Department of Physiology, Burdwan Medical College and Hospital, Burdwan, West Bengal, India
3 Department of Orthopaedics, Burdwan Medical College and Hospital, Burdwan, West Bengal, India
4 Department of Gynaecology and Obstretics, ESI Hospital, Durgapur, West Bengal, India
5 Department of Community Medicine, Burdwan Medical College and Hospital, Burdwan, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Arunima Chaudhuri
Krishnasayar South, Borehat, Burdwan - 713 102, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1319-6308.180178

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Background: Traumatic cervical cord injury (CCI) management requires extended acute care and lifelong chronic care. Aims: The present study was aimed to find out that after traumatic CCI, if neurological recovery takes place, how early it starts, how long it continues, and after how many weeks we can safely prognosticate that no more recovery will take place. Materials and Methods: Different epidemiological factors, radiological evidence of trauma, types of injury, cause, mechanism of injury, and level were recorded. The patients were examined every week to record any neurological recovery, either as per Frankel's or ASIA grading. These recordings were done till 6 weeks of admission. Cervical fractures were usually treated by continuous skull traction either by Crutchfield tong traction or by head halter traction giving adequate weight according to the level of vertebral fracture. At the end of 2 years, we followed the recovery pattern in 126 CCI patients. Results: 20.00% of patients showed signs of recovery and 56.36% patients did not show any sign of recovery in complete lesion. 69.01% of patients showed sign of recovery and 25.35% patients did not show any sign of recovery in incomplete lesion. 53.84% of patients showed the first sign of neurological recovery within 1 st week, 32.30% in 2 nd week, 9.23% in 3 rd week, and 4.61% in 4 th week. In upper cervical spine lesion, 22.22% of patients showed first sign of neurological recovery within 1 st week, 55.55% in 2 nd week, 16.11% in 3 rd week, and 5.55% in 4 th week. In lower cervical spine lesion, 65.95% of patients showed the first sign of neurological recovery within 1 st week, 23.40% in 2 nd week, 8.51% in 3 rd week, and 2.12% in 4 th week. Conclusions: In traumatic CCI, patients' level of lesion, type of injury, and nature of injury may be helpful in the early prediction of recovery pattern of patients and careful monitoring of these patients may reduce the social burden in developing countries and reduce morbidity and mortality of these patients.


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